Lee: washington-dc

An emerging battleground: Housing in the 2020 presidential election

Issues related to poverty and homelessness have long been pushed to the periphery of presidential elections. But with the housing crisis on course to be the most severe in history, they are of vital importance to a record number of Americans. The two candidates offer vastly different views of how to address homelessness in the United States. Trump’s record and statements show he is skeptical of government fiscal intervention and the housing-first model and supports a deregulatory approach, whereas Biden advocates for the federal government to play a much larger role through greater funding and rulemaking. Street Sense outlines the candidates’ platforms.

Response to protests upends daily life for homeless people in downtown Washington DC

As near-constant Black Lives Matter protests have become a fixture near the White House, people experiencing homelessness in the area are finding themselves caught in the crossfire between demonstrators and law enforcement.

Black lives matter: Protest movement against racism, oppression and police brutality sweeps across America

Since the death of George Floyd, a young black man killed by a white police officer as his colleagues stood idly by, protests have sprung up across the US and other parts of the world calling for an end to systemic racial injustices and police brutality. American street papers were present at many of those protests.

Vendor City Guide: Washington DC

The Big Issue has been reaching out to vendors across the street paper network to get the inside scoop on the cities they know best. This instalment features Street Sense vendor Wendell talking about Washington DC in the US.

Two Washington DC vendors on a big year to come in American politics

2020 will be a momentous year in US politics. Will Trump evade impeachment to be re-elected? Will the Democrats find a big enough character to run against him? To measure the pulse in the US capital, two Street Sense vendors from Washington DC, with very different opinions, give their take on the state of the nation.

There are literally thousands of people dying homeless on the streets of America

Days before Christmas, communities across the US joined together to memorialise those who had died while homeless that year. INSP North America director Israel Bayer summed up the tragedies that have beset countless homeless Americans, while a group of the country’s street papers collaborated on making sure these remembrances, and the people they were about, were noticed.

Street papers respond to President Trump’s homelessness comments

Last week, US President Donald Trump made comments about homelessness that garnered some bewildered reactions. Homelessness is an issue rarely spoken on by Trump. But a community of people who know a thing or two about homelessness in the US are street paper staff and vendors. A selection of them, from Portland’s Street Roots and Washington, D.C.’s Street Sense, had their say.

A style all his own: Street Sense vendor Franklin Sterling on his poetry

Writing poems since he was a teenager, Street Sense Media artist and vendor Franklin Sterling has developed a unique style based in medieval English and blending other languages to create something all his own.

Our vendors: Jackie Turner (Street Sense Media, Washington D.C., USA)

Jackie Turner is an artist and Street Sense Media vendor whose experience of homelessness has changed her worldview. She is acutely aware of the fact that homelessness happens for a range of reasons and that being homeless can be a depressing and hopeless experience. For Jackie, learning to love herself and appreciating the beauty around her has helped her to feel a powerful sense of connection to the world.

INSP Vendor Playlist: Street Sense vendors on the songs that stir their emotions

This year we asked vendors: if you could give a song as a present this Christmas, what would you choose? The result was the INSP Vendor Playlist, which is now available for your listening pleasure. Street Sense vendors in Washington DC talk about their song choices, which range from festive classics to T-Pain.

Our vendors: Chon Gotti (Street Sense, Washington DC, USA)

Chon Gotti, a vendor and salesman, discusses how he found himself without housing and how he moved beyond that point. A former officer, an advocate and parent, Gotti sees life as a matter of pride, confidence and strength. Along with discussing his business strategies, Gotti works to be a reminder that the homeless are not a stereotype, but people just like anyone else.

“It’s impossible to count the number of lives Michael Stoops changed”

U.S. campaigner Michael Stoops, who passed away this week, spent decades fighting for people experiencing homelessness. Street Sense pays tribute.

Fare to Share: Washington D.C. restauranteur leading by tasty example

Humble social entrepreneur Kazi Mannan opens the door of his restaurant to the city’s homeless community, as a place to eat for free.

Hundreds gather in D.C. to spread the love at event organised by former Street Sense vendor

Hundreds gathered in Washington D.C.’s Franklin Square Park for a community event organised by former Street Sense vendor Don Gardner.

EmergencyBnB: can the sharing economy be a caring economy?

Washington D.C social entrepreneur Amr Arafa’s EmergencyBnB is more than just AirBnB with a twist. It’s offering hope to refugees and victims of domestic violence.

“I’m in the country now” Street Sense vendor reflects on new life on the farm

Street Sense vendor Eric Thomson-Bey recently left Washington D.C. for employment on a farm in Pennsylvania. He reflects on his new rural life.

Street Sense vendor explains why his paper is a “lifeline from drowning in depression”

In this uplifting and inspiring personal essay, Damon Smith explains exactly what it means to be a street paper vendor. He reveals how selling Street Sense in Washington D.C. helped him overcome the “mental torture” of homelessness.

Our vendors: Martin Walker (Street Sense, Washington DC, USA)

“I felt the reality of poverty,” says Martin Walker of his upbringing in Southeast DC. His mother worked full-time but paying the bills for her five children was a constant struggle.