Vendor City Guide: Memphis

The Big Issue has been reaching out to vendors across the street paper network to get the inside scoop on the cities they know best. Here, The Bridge vendor Tony talks about Memphis.

Vendor City Guide: Philadelphia

The Big Issue has been reaching out to vendors across the street paper network to get the inside scoop on the cities they know best. Here, One Step Away vendor Sylvia talks about Philadelphia.

Our vendors: Mei-hung Sung (The Big Issue Taiwan, Tainan, Taiwan)

Mei-hung is a Big Issue Taiwan vendor on Guohua Street in Tainan. She speaks about her work in a variety of jobs, the illnesses that have stopped her from finding steady work and the kindness of strangers that makes her life easier.

Street papers from across East Asia and Australia get together for INSP’s first Asia-Pacific regional meeting

Staff from four Big Issue titles based in Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and Australia got together in Osaka for INSP’s first Asia-Pacific regional meeting, to talk and learn more about the unique problems facing each of them and the innovative projects they are involved in.

Our vendors: Tokuchika Nishi (The Big Issue Japan, Tokyo, Japan)

Tokuchika Nishi has lived an interesting life. The now Big Issue Japan vendor talks us through growing up in Kyushu, studying, joining the army and taking part in disaster relief, and finally returning to Tokyo where he became homeless. He also talks of his love of dance and joining the Newcomer “H” Sokerissa performance group.

Scottish school pupils collaborate with The Big Issue to create, and sell, a special edition of the street paper

The Big Issue has teamed up with the Social Enterprise Academy bringing together pupils from Scottish schools to put together a special edition of the street paper. The magazine, which gave the young people a platform to raise awareness about the social issues they care most about, is now being sold by the kids at their respective schools, and has been included as a supplement in the current edition being sold by vendors.

Liceulice vendors write letters to their younger selves

In what has become a go-to style of article across street papers, Serbia’s Liceulice asked its vendors to think about what they would say to themselves when they were young – if they had the opportunity.

Dreaming of a better tomorrow: Big Issue Korea vendor has book published

Sangcheol Im is a Big Issue Korea vendor who, after 18 years of experiencing homelessness, found the itch to write and tell his story. After writing 52 letters, which he gave out to his interested customers, the writings have been collated and published as a book. The Big Issue Korea spoke to him about this journey.

Our vendors: Magdalena (Augustin, Baden, Austria)

Magdalena moved to Austria from her home in Romania to sell Augustin. Her employment prospects back in her home country are slim. She spoke to the street paper about the obstacles keeping her from staying in Pitești with her family, as well as acclimating to Austrian food.

The pain, cost and stigma of parasites from living on the streets

Portland’s Street Roots has started a periodic column about the parts of homelessness most people don’t talk about. In this instalment, now shared with INSP, vendors describe their experiences of picking up parasites and bugs, such as head lice and scabies, mainly at hostels and shelters, and the effect it has on an already difficult way of living.

Eleven rooms for women in need at Nuremberg’s Haus Sonnenschein

This International Women’s Day, INSP is drawing attention to some articles from street papers which focus on the experiences of homeless and marginalised women. Strassenkrezuer recently featured a story on ‘Haus Sonnenschein’ (‘House of Sunshine’), a shelter for women who have nowhere else to go, and the only one exclusively for women in Nuremberg.

The “hidden homelessness” of women on the streets

This International Women’s Day, INSP is sharing stories from street papers that highlight the experiences of homeless women. Women are less likely to end up sleeping rough than men. They are more likely to receive help, and may have better support networks. But they are also more vulnerable on the streets. Swizz street paper Surprise looks at some of the reasons why women are less likely to be expected to end up on the streets.