INSP News Service

The INSP News Service is one of our key member services, providing editorial support to street papers to build their capacity and quality, and increase vendors’ sales. These highlights from our weekly members' news feed demonstrate the talent working in the street paper movement.

News posts by INSP News Service:

Our vendors: Victoria (Big Issue North, Manchester, UK)

Victoria came to the UK from Romania a year ago and has been a Big Issue North vendor for around nine months. She wants to build a future for herself and her partner, Ionut, here in the UK and to find a stable job. Victoria enjoys her work as a Big Issue North vendor and is grateful for all of the support and help that she has had from her customers.

Our vendors: David K (The Big Issue Australia, Brisbane)

David K has been selling The Big Issue for over a decade from his pitch in Brisbane’s central business district. He started working as a vendor when his life was on an upswing, and things have only improved since then. David is the proud father of a daughter now in college and a keen street soccer player, and he wants to thank his customers for their support over the years.

Being a woman and homeless

Women aged 24 to 34, often with children, are the most likely to access homelessness services in Australia, while homelessness among older women is on the rise. Big Issue Australia vendor Cheryl shares her experiences of being homeless as a woman.

Our vendors: Julie “Jewel” Chapman (Megaphone, Vancouver, Canada)

A mom of two kids and two cats, Julie “Jewel” Chapman would take everyone under her wing for protection if she could. Her altruistic activism fuels her work within the Downtown Eastside community of Vancouver, where she is a support worker for sex workers and those struggling with addiction. Despite some people’s negative attitude towards the DTES, Jewel feels that her neighbourhood is a wonderful community full of hope.

Tunan Sadik: The vendor who has transformed his family home

Last year, Lice v Lice featured the story of one of its vendors, Tunan Sadik, and stated that he was “one of those people who succeed in their lives”. Less than a year later, Tunan has used his success as a magazine vendor to provide a better home for himself and for the rest of his family. We visited him at home in the Shutka neighbourhood of Skopje to find out more.

Paws everything: Curbside vendors share what their furry friends mean to them

The editors of The Curbside Chronicle make room in every issue to share personal stories from Curbside vendors, as their goal to document the challenges of homelessness. Homelessness can be an extremely difficult path and going it alone is never easy, which is why readers might notice that some of the magazine’s vendors have pets. In a series of conversations with Curbside vendors, we find out more about the furballs who have wagged their way into vendors hearts and become an integral part of the Curbside community.

Our vendors: Lung-yen Huang (The Big Issue Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan)

Mr. Huang sells The Big Issue Taiwan from his pitch outside the Qizhang metro station in Taipei. His life changed five years ago when two workplace accidents and a cancer diagnosis transformed his physical health. Having made peace with the past, Huang is grateful that being a Big Issue vendor provides him with a steady income and is looking forward to the future with hope.

Different perspectives: “Repicturing Homeless” photo project shows homeless people in a fresh new light

Clothes make the man: a principle that vendors of Düsseldorf street paper fiftyfifty had the chance to experience first-hand as the subjects of an unusual photo shoot. Advertising agency Havas collaborated with the world’s leading photo agency Getty Images to create a completely new perception of people living on the street, with the aim of helping to challenge existing prejudices. Their campaign, called “Repicturing Homeless”, has received media coverage all around the world.

Surprise tour guide’s unique perspective of his city

Roger Meier’s vision of Bern, Switzerland, is different to that of a Federal Council member or that of Japanese tourists visiting the city. It is also profoundly different from the perspective of an average Bernese. In his work as a Surprise tour guide in Bern, Roger Meier is sharing his experiences of living on the streets for 20 years.

Our vendors: Ali Nur Mohammed (Surprise, Basel, Switzerland)

Surprise vendor Ali Nur Mohammed was badly injured in an attack carried out by Al-Shabaab terrorists in Somalia. He lost his right leg in the attack and the prosthetic limb that he has worn ever since causes him chronic pain. After reading about him in an issue of Surprise, Ronnie Schenkein set up a fund for Mohammed. This is what happened when the two met for the first time.

“Hairdressing is a social service”

Recently, two street papers in different parts of the world published similar stories celebrating organisations that give free haircuts to homeless people. Dortmund-based magazine bodo told the story of the Barber’s Angels, a group of professional hairdressers from all over the North Rhine-Westphalia region who had come to Bochum to dish out complimentary styling. Across the Atlantic, Nashville’s The Contributor described a day of business for the Nashville Street Barbers.

Megaphone vendor to run for public office in Vancouver

When we hear from vendors, it is usually to learn more about their experiences with homelessness and how working as a street paper seller has helped them. But vendors do all sorts of outstanding, inspiring things that we might not know about. Gerald “Spike” Peachey aims to use all of his experiences from the streets to help build a city where everyone can live their best lives by running for councillor in Vancouver’s civic election later this month. He sets out the reasons why the people in his district should vote for him.